EDUCATION | Teaching tomorrow’s leaders 

Students in Baker’s education program graduate fully prepared to teach the next generation of learners. Our reputation for producing top teachers puts our graduates in high demand. That’s why 100 percent of our 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 graduates had jobs within three months of graduation.

The excellence of our education graduates doesn’t stop at graduation, however. Baker grads have been nominated for the Kansas Teacher of the Year award nine out of the last 10 years and several have received the Kansas Horizon Award for first-year teaching.
Because our curriculum is firmly based in the arts and sciences, Baker students develop communication skills to express ideas clearly orally and in writing and hone the creativity, problem solving, and critical thinking skills needed to succeed in the challenging and rewarding field of education.

Our students get hands-on experience long before graduation and leave with all the tools necessary to excel in classrooms of their own.

DIVERSE DEGREES

Students can earn specializations in general elementary (K-6), three areas specific to the middle level (5-8), and 11 areas of licensure at the secondary level (6-12). Learn more about professional education requirements and endorsements.

COMMUNICATION & CREATIVITY

Students develop the communication skills, creativity, and critical thinking skills needed to solve problems and succeed in classrooms of their own.

FROM LEARNING TO LEADING

Hands-on classroom experience is the foundation of Baker’s education program—from your first education course as a freshman through student teaching to end your college career. We work closely with school districts locally and in the Kansas City area to help students secure rewarding student-teaching positions and jobs after graduation.
Learn More

STUDENT EDUCATION ASSOCIATION

With membership in the Kansas National Education Association-Student Programs, SEA is one of the nation’s most respected KNEA-SP chapters and has been recognized for Outstanding Local Excellence at the NEA Student Leadership conference.


CALLIE | Education Major, 2016

Callie believes the best part of Baker’s education program is its atmosphere of understanding, acceptance, and encouragement. She is going to use those tools she has learned as she takes her next step in her career. “Within this community, Baker University undoubtedly made me more successful, confident, and passionate.”


CAREERS

Our education majors go on to lead preK-12 classrooms and many win awards for their dedication and leadership. Graduates of our education program often go on to complete graduate and doctoral degrees and earn jobs as principals and administrators.

%

of graduates are employed full time or enrolled in graduate school within six months of receiving their diploma.

TEACHERS OF PROMISE | School of Education

Schools of education in Kansas may nominate two talented students for the Teachers of Promise honor each semester. These students are recognized during the Kansas Exemplary Educators Network State Education Conference.

Spring 2016

CALLIE BRABENDER | Elementary Education
MELISSA KINZER | Secondary Eduction & Science

Fall 2015

CLAIRE WHITE | Secondary Education & Mathematics
TIFFANI SEXTONS | Elementary Eduction

Spring 2015

SAMANTHA WRIGHT | Elementary Education
HANNAH GEENENS | Secondary Eduction & Spanish

Fall 2014

RENATA DILL | Elementary Education
COOPER CLARK | Middle-Level Science Education

Spring 2014

LAUREN JAQUA | Secondary Education & English
NICOLE WELCH-WARD | Teacher Certification in Elementary Education

Fall 2013

BRYAN KINDLE | Secondary Education & Mathematics
LINDSEY BROWN | Secondary Education & Mathematics

Spring 2013

MARIAH BARNETT | Music Education
HALEY EPPERSON | Elementary Education

Spring 2012

ASHLEY UKENA | Elementary Education
JUSTIN HILL | History & Government, Secondary Education

Fall 2011

LAUREN ANDERSON | Elementary Education
ADRIENNE BARCLAY | Music Education

Spring 2011

KRISTEN BURCHETT | Elementary Education
MATT ELLIS | Mathematics, Secondary Education
Course Descriptions

R: course can be repeated for credit; P/NC: course graded on a pass/no credit basis

Courses required for these programs are listed in the current catalog.

ED 100 – Teaching as a Career

Every semester
This course is designed to introduce prospective educators to the teaching profession and to explore the field of teaching as a career. Students will research state licensure requirements and examine career options. They will receive a current Teacher Education Policy and Programs Handbook, write a teaching philosophy, and interview a practicing licensed teacher. (1 credit hour)

ED 143 – Movement and Rhythm

Spring term, biennially in odd years
This course covers methods of teaching basic dance routines and movement patterns in the educational environment. The impact of dance on growth and development of school-age children will be part of the presentations. (1 credit hour)

ED 180 – Concepts of Health

Yearly
This course fosters an understanding of conditions and situations which affect an individual’s health and well-being in order to provide the student with the skills needed to promote better personal and community health. (3 credit hours)

IS 199 – Diversity in Education

January Interterm
Diversity in Education is a required urban field experience practicum that provides prospective teachers with the opportunity to gain valuable experience working in a diverse school setting and in a virtual school setting. Candidates will be assigned to a school in Kansas City. On-campus class sessions will be held in Baldwin City. Self-reflection will be an integral component of this Interterm. During the course of the Interterm, candidates will be expected to progress from a classroom observer to a functioning teacher’s aide. Prerequisites: ED 100, 243, 244, 320, at least conditional status, and junior or senior status. (3 credit hours)

ED 240 – Techniques of Teaching Team Sports

Spring term, biennially in odd years
Students will gain knowledge of teaching techniques for team sports traditionally found in physical education curricula. Rules of sport, strategy of team play, and individual skill performance are components of the course. (3 credit hours)

ED 241 – Techniques of Teaching Individual and Dual Sports

Fall term, biennially in even years
This course provides students with the skills to teach individual and dual sport activities traditionally found in physical education curricula. Rules of sport, strategy of play, and skill performance are components of the course. (3 credit hours)

ED 243 – Introduction to Education

Every semester
The course content includes instruction in the social, historical, and philosophical foundations of education, as well as components of lesson design. Course emphasis is placed on the professional attitudes crucial for those working with young people: awareness of the value of education, respect for all students, acceptance of diversity and its impact on learning, and an awareness of the teacher’s role as facilitator of student learning. At-risk students are researched and groups presentations cover approaches for successful experiences for these students. Pre- or co-requisite: ED 100. (2 credit hours)

ED 244 – Education Field Practicum I

Every semester
This one-hour practicum is designed to provide students with an initial classroom experience. After being assigned a mentor teacher, students will: assist in various areas whenever appropriate, observe and record effective classroom management, and possibly facilitate the implementation of accommodations with students as needed. If you are seeking PreK-12 license, this practicum also provides you with the opportunity to spend time in a Pre-Kindergarten setting. Please see instructor for details. Prerequisites: ED 100, 243, and sophomore status. P/NC (1 credit hour)

ED 252 – Practicum Experience in Health

Every semester
This course is designed to provide Health/Physical Education Teaching majors the opportunity to collaborate and engage in various health education settings outside of the K-12 school setting. The student will devote a minimum of 20 hrs. of experience to this course. The student will work with an advisor and establish objectives for the experience, maintain a time log with specific activities involved, and prepare a summarizing statement of the total experience. Prerequisites: Junior or senior status and Department Chair approval. P/NC (1 credit hour)

ED 262 – Children’s Literature

Fall only
This course emphasizes the reading, evaluation, and presentation of literature appropriate for elementary and middle-level learners. The class will explore various literary genres through the reading of authentic children’s books, poetry collections, picture books, and novels. Specific topics of study include: the history of children’s literature; diversity of characters, settings, plots, themes, and cultures; and prominent authors and illustrators. A variety of literary presentation and teaching methods will be explored. This course does not count toward the major in English. Prerequisites: ED 100 and 243. (Cross-listed as EN 262.) (3 credit hours)

ED 264 – Foundations of Classroom Management

Every semester
This course is an introduction to the theory and application of management techniques that provide the basis for an effective, efficient, and positive classroom climate. Techniques that result in effective use of time, efficient use of materials, and improved student behavior are identified and practiced. Emphasis is placed on the importance of classroom dynamics in creating a proactive approach to classroom management. Students will create a comprehensive classroom management plan. Prerequisites: ED 100 and 243. (1 credit hour)

ED 265 – Technology for Teachers

Every semester
This course will feature inquiry-based constructivist activities which stress the creation of authentic and useful classroom products. The activities will focus on three concepts: 1) technology skills that all educators should possess to enhance instruction in the classroom, 2) activities for students to complete that will increase meaningful learning about technology and how to integrate it into the classroom, and 3) the creation of a website that students can use as a beginning portfolio. The instructional uses of the Internet, word processing, presentation options, Internet safety, multimedia, and online tools will be components of this course. Prerequisites: ED 100 and 243. (1 credit hour)

ED 309 – Evaluation Techniques for the Classroom

Every semester
This course focuses on the decision-making skills practiced by teachers in developing effective classroom assessments. Candidates will explore the processes, as well as the products, of assessment as they utilize information gathered at the diagnostic, formative, and summative phases of assessment to guide instruction. The strengths and weaknesses of both formal and informal assessment techniques will be examined. Candidates will develop tests and authentic assessments for students with varying abilities and learning styles. Rubrics that inform students of expected criteria and quality levels will be developed. Participants will acquire fundamental statistical concepts to interpret standardized test results for use in a videotaped simulated parent-teacher conference. A computerized grade book program is examined. In addition, tenure/contract laws and case law dealing with schools are discussed. Prerequisites: ED 100 and 243. (3 credit hours)

ED 313 – Bilingual Education

Every semester
This course provides an overview of bilingual education to include the history, policies, programs, and research on effective bilingual education programs. Topics covered include: 1) language acquisition theories; 2) the role of primary language literacy in second language acquisition; 3) second language instruction (using methods for teaching English as a Second Language – ESL – and content area instruction through the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol – SIOP); and 4) culturally responsive teaching strategies will be emphasized. This course will also provide students with opportunities to explore effective tools to enhance speaking and writing in a language other than English, allowing students to increase their level of awareness, knowledge, and skills that will render them more effective teachers with linguistically and culturally diverse students and families. Prerequisites: ED 100 and sophomore status. Pre- or co-requisite: ED 243. (3 credit hours)

ED 320 – Education Field Service Practicum II

Every semester
This one-hour practicum is designed to provide students continued classroom experience. After being assigned a mentor teacher, students will: assist in various areas whenever appropriate, lead whole-class and small group learning, observe and record effective classroom management, and possibly facilitate the implementation of accommodations with students as needed. If you are seeking a PreK-12 license, this practicum also provides you with the opportunity to spend time in a Pre-Kindergarten setting. Please see instructor for details. Prerequisites: ED 100, 243, and 244. P/NC (1 credit hour)

ED 322 – Education Field Service Practicum III

Every semester
This one-hour practicum is designed to provide students with a specialized classroom experience tailored to meet their individualized needs. Students will meet with the PDS Coordinator to devise a course of study that best addresses the student’s needs and the relevant course objectives. Prerequisites: ED 243, 320, and department recommendation. P/NC (1 credit hour)

ED 331 – Methods for Teaching Elementary and Middle-Level Mathematics

Spring only
This course examines the methods, materials, and activities that are appropriate for use in grades K-8 mathematics programs. Students will explore their own attitudes toward mathematics, plan lessons with problem-solving as the primary focus, and work with school-aged pupils. The course is based on national and state mathematics standards. Prerequisites: ED 100 and 243 and MA 262, or Department Chair approval. (3 credit hours)

ED 333 – Teaching Economics and Geography in the Classroom

Spring only
This course will provide students with the foundations of content for teaching economic and geographic knowledge, concepts, and skills. Students will develop the knowledge and understanding of significant terms, ideas, people, places, and events of each discipline. State and national standards for economics and geography will be addressed to ensure students understand the essential concepts, principles, and interrelationships that will be required for licensure and classroom teaching. The knowledge and understanding gained from this course will enable students to create effective classroom learning experiences related to economics and geography. Prerequisites: ED 100 and 243. (3 credit hours)

ED 339 – Methods of Teaching Physical Education and Health

Fall term only
This course is a study of the principles related to the selection and use of teaching techniques for physical education and health programs in the Pre K-12 schools. This includes the understanding of the values of physical activity for healthy lifestyles, the comprehension of the historical perspectives for the evolvement of elementary, middle, and secondary school physical education and health curriculum, current trends in health and physical education instruction, student learning styles, and the assessment of student learning. The course will include the creation of lesson plans, unit plans, and measurement techniques along with effective teaching skills. The course will also include a field experience component in all three levels of classroom instruction. This course is designed to develop instructional skills required of PreK-12 PE/Health teachers. The course will involve many activities related to teaching, including developing a) instructional strategies that will enhance the learning at all levels, b) lesson plans and delivering lessons, c) meaningful classroom learning activities, d) technology applications, e) student outcomes and assessments, f) teaching techniques for diverse learners, and g) effective communication with parents. Candidates will create a list of and use effective teaching strategies and develop technology applications and problem-solving skills for the classroom. In addition, candidates will develop student assessments and rubrics, and create student behavior plans and learning modifications for the PE/Health PreK-12 classroom. Prerequisite: ED 180, ED 240, ED 241, or permission of the instructor (3 credit hours)

ED 342 – Language and Communication Arts in the Secondary English Classroom

Fall term, biennially in even years
This course is an in-depth study of content and methods needed for the teacher in the secondary English language arts classroom. Language and communication skills as they relate to reading, writing, listening, and speaking are examined. Current research in best pedagogical practices in the secondary classroom is considered and demonstrated through lesson planning and presentation. Additional emphases in this course include understanding developmentally appropriate practice for the adolescent learner, knowing and applying national and state standards in curriculum planning, creating a motivating classroom environment, using technology in the language arts classroom, assessing secondary English language arts students and their work, considering the needs of diverse and special-needs learners, and becoming a reflective practitioner. Prerequisites: ED 100 and 243. (3 credit hours)

ED 343 – Educational Psychology

Every semester
This course investigates many psychological factors that impact learning. Students will investigate a number of the leading theories that relate to student learning and development. Other areas investigated include: learner engagement, multiple intelligences, constructivism, managing the classroom environment, meaningful instruction, information processing, and motivation and diversity of students, as well as teacher dispositions. Students will examine the psychological aspects of becoming a professional in a classroom, which involve: a commitment to learners, reflective decision-making, and professional knowledge. Prerequisites: PY 111, ED 100, and 243. (3 credit hours)

ED 345 – Psychology of the Exceptional Learner

Every semester
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of the field of special education and a basic understanding of special education law, differentiated instruction, and best practices, including technology applications specifically designed to accommodate students with special needs. Students learn about the etiology, identification, and characteristics of the major disabilities recognized under federal law and about students with high cognitive ability. Emphasis is placed on classroom management and teacher decision-making, as well as the professional attitudes and responsibilities related to providing inclusive educational practices. Prerequisites: ED 100 and 243 or Department Chair approval (3 credit hours)

ED 348 – Methods for Teaching Elementary and Middle School Science

Fall only
This course examines the methods, materials, and activities that are appropriate for use in elementary and middle school science programs. These methods, materials, and activities serve as the point of departure for the study of the scientific concepts and principles that one must possess in order to teach science effectively at these levels from an inquiry-based perspective. Weekly hands-on lab experiences are an integral part of this course. Prerequisites: ED 100 and 243. (3 credit hours)

ED 352 – Essentials of Reading and Literacy

Spring only
This course is a study of the theory and practice of teaching reading and language arts in the elementary and middle schools. Special focuses of the course will center on the five components of effective reading instruction, which include phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary learning, comprehension, and fluency. Students must enroll concurrently in ED 353. Prerequisites: ED 100, 243, 262, and 366. (3 credit hours)

ED 353 – Core Literacy Practicum

Spring only
Students have the opportunity to apply what is learned in ED 352 during this supervised practicum in the elementary and middle schools. Students will demonstrate effective literacy instruction across the curriculum by developing and delivering developmentally appropriate lessons based on both formative and summative assessment. Students must enroll concurrently in ED 352 and ED 353. Prerequisites: ED 100, 243, and 366. (3 credit hours)

ED 362 – Exploring Young Adult Literature

Spring term, biennially in odd years
This course emphasizes the investigation of YA literature through reading, discussion, and evaluation. The class will explore various literary sub-genres of YA literature through a thematic approach. Specific topics of study include: the history of young adult literature, the place of young adult literature in the secondary English content classroom, literary elements of selections (characters, settings, plots, themes, and cultures) notable YA authors, and controversial issues presented in YA literature. The explorations of the young adult literary genre will take two tracks within the same course. The English major will develop a literary framework for the study of YA literature, which will include works across various sub-genres, identifying stylistic devices used within the works, and utilizing approaches to formal literary criticism of selections read. The English education major consideration of the genre will include a degree of literary criticism, with an emphasis on a variety of pedagogical presentations and teaching methods appropriate for the middle and secondary English language arts classroom. (Cross-listed as EN 362). (3 credit hours)

ED 363 – Elementary School Social Studies

Spring only
This course provides an examination of the content, materials, and activities appropriate for an elementary school social studies program. Citizenship and democratic values are main themes, as well as student diversity. The integrated study of history, geography, economics, and civics/government is investigated, while focusing on instructional strategies that promote critical thinking and preparation for active citizenship. Prerequisite: ED 100 and 243. Pre- or co-requisite: ED 333. (3 credit hours)

ED 366 – Teaching Elementary Language Arts in the Content Areas

Fall only
This course is the study of the development of language from early childhood through adolescence. Focus is on the interrelationship of a child’s listening, speaking, reading, and writing and their content area learning. Emphases are placed on theories of language development, as well as effective classroom strategies for the teaching of the language arts. The course serves as a foundation and prerequisite for the courses ED 352 and ED 353. Prerequisites: ED 100 and 243. (3 credit hours)

ED 368 – Teaching Reading in the Secondary Content Areas

Spring only
This course focuses on the importance and variety of reading strategies and techniques useful in the teaching of the various subject areas. Another important component of this course is the study of effective teaching techniques. Prerequisites: ED 100 and 243. (3 credit hours)

ED 381 – Integrating Music in the Elementary Classroom

Fall only
Music can play a valuable role in the learning of virtually all subjects taught in the elementary schools. This course demonstrates how music can be used with other curricular and classroom activities to enhance and enrich the learning of all subjects. Participants will use activities in music to enhance learning through the interrelationship of disciplines, encourage communication, gain a better understanding of diverse backgrounds, promote critical thinking skills, and encourage creativity. Pre-service teachers will develop competencies, skills, and confidence to use music effectively in the elementary classroom setting. Emphasis in this course is on preparing and presenting lessons that provide opportunities for integrating music to support elementary classroom learning. Prerequisites: ED 100 and 243. (1 credit hour)

ED 382 – Elementary and Middle-Level Art

Fall only
This course will assist the elementary and middle school teacher in designing, implementing, and evaluating art education experiences. Content experiences will enhance and reinforce the teaching and learning of core curriculum content and concepts. These experiences will also include the understanding of the value of the impact of art on defining cultures, preserving history, and promoting relationships and personal well-being. Emphasis is on activities and information relevant to the non-art education teacher. Prerequisites: ED 100 and 243. (1 credit hour)

ED 383 – Elementary and Middle-Level Physical Education and Health

Fall only
This course will assist the elementary and middle school teacher in designing, implementing, and evaluating physical education and health experiences. Content experiences will enhance and reinforce the teaching and learning of core curriculum content and concepts. These experiences will also include an understanding of the value of the impact of brain function and physical exercise on the academic learning process. Intertwined will be how the use of physical activity can promote relationships and personal well-being. Emphasis is on activities and information relevant to the non-physical education teacher. Prerequisites: ED 100 and ED 243. (1 credit hour)

ED 409 – Teaching Middle-Level Learners

Biennially
This course presents an overview of educating the middle school/junior high school learner. The unique characteristics of a young adolescent student are considered, with special emphases on curriculum theories, instructional planning, effective pedagogical practices, classroom management techniques, and motivational strategies. Additionally, the course will also focus on the historical and philosophical foundations of the middle and junior high school models of education. Prerequisites: ED 100 and 243; junior or senior status recommended. (3 credit hours)

ED 410 – Methods for Teaching Secondary School Science

Fall only
This course is designed to develop instructional skills of secondary science teachers. The course will involve many science-related areas including planning, delivering, and evaluating lessons and laboratory experiments based on secondary science curriculum and teaching standards (Biology, Chemistry, and Physics). ED 410 is designed to develop instructional skills required of secondary science teachers. The course will involve many activities related to teaching including developing a) instructional strategies that will enhance the learning at all levels, b) lesson plans and delivering lessons, c) meaningful classroom learning activities, d) technology applications, e) student outcomes and assessments, f) teaching techniques for diverse learners, and g) effective communication with parents. Candidates will create a list of and use effective teaching strategies and develop technology applications and problem-solving skills for the classroom. In addition, candidates will develop student assessments and rubrics, and create student behavior plans and learning modifications for the secondary classroom. Prerequisites: ED 100, 243 and 244; junior status recommended. (3 credit hours)

ED 411 – Methods of Teaching PreK-12 Art

This course is designed to address the needs of students seeking licensure as PreK-12 art teachers. It considers both curriculum development and methods of instruction. Attention is given to the special problems of the art teacher, including attitudes toward originality, evaluation, and products. The course will involve many activities related to teaching including developing a) instructional strategies that will enhance the learning, b) lesson plans and delivering lessons, c) meaningful classroom learning activities, d) technology applications, e) student outcomes and assessments, f) teaching techniques for diverse learners, and g) effective communication with parents. Candidates will create a list of and use effective teaching strategies and develop technology applications and problem solving skills for the classroom. In addition, candidates will develop student assessments and rubrics, and create student behavior plans and learning modifications for the PreK-12 art classroom. In addition to class meeting times, candidates will also be required to participate in 25 hours of practicum experience. (3 credit hours)

ED 412 – Methods for Teaching Secondary School Mathematics

Fall only
This course is designed to develop instructional skills of secondary mathematics teachers. The course will involve many mathematics-related areas including planning, delivering, and evaluating lessons based on secondary math curriculum and teaching standards. Candidates will discuss appropriate approaches to teaching diverse and special needs students and communicating with parents about sensitive issues. The course will involve many activities related to teaching including developing a) instructional strategies that will enhance the learning at all levels, b) lesson plans and delivering lessons, c) meaningful classroom learning activities, d) technology applications, e) student outcomes and assessments, f) teaching techniques for diverse learners, and g) effective communication with parents. Candidates will create a list of and use effective teaching strategies and develop technology applications and problem solving skills for the classroom. In addition, candidates will develop student assessments and rubrics, and create student behavior plans and learning modifications for the secondary classroom. Prerequisites: ED 100, 243, and 244; junior status recommended. (3 credit hours)

ED 413 – Methods for Teaching Adaptive Learners

Fall only
This course investigates instructional methods and strategies for teaching the adaptive learner. Focused attention is given to the research-based interventions suggested by the 2000 National Reading Panel, Learning Disabilities Association, International Dyslexia Association, and the Council for Exceptional Children. The course will discuss the selection of materials, planning instructional environments, strategies for providing corrective feedback, and strategies for communicating effectively with parents, school personnel, and community agencies. Prerequisites: ED 100, 243, and 345. (3 credit hours)

ED 414 – Characteristics of Adaptive Learners

Spring only
This course will cover a broad range of competencies in teaching the adaptive learner including definitions, characteristics, legal and ethical concerns, and causes. Instructional models, procedures for assessment and placement, approaches to teaching, and parent and family issues will be addressed. Prerequisites: ED 100, 243, and 345. (3 credit hours)

ED 415 – Practicum for Adaptive Learners

Every semester
This off-campus practicum experience is designed to provide students with an opportunity to work with special needs students. Candidates will be assigned to experienced teachers who teach adaptive learners. During the course, candidates will be expected to progress from classroom observers to functioning teacher aides conducting supervised formative and summative assessments, behavioral observations, and teaching small groups. In seminar discussions, students will discuss how to interpret the data and make instructional decisions. This course is open to students who desire a special education field of concentration. This is a graded course. Prerequisites: ED 100, 243, 345, and either 413 or 414. (3 credit hours)

ED 417 – Methods of Teaching Business

Fall semester only
This course addresses the concepts and skills needed for teaching secondary courses in general business, accounting, consumer economics, and free enterprise. Attention is directed to planning and teaching strategies needed in business courses. Student-developed projects constitute an important element of the course. ED 417 is designed to develop instructional skills required of secondary business teachers. The course will involve many activities related to teaching including developing a) instructional strategies that will enhance the learning at all levels, b) lesson plans and delivering lessons, c) meaningful classroom learning activities, d) technology applications, e) student outcomes and assessments, f) teaching techniques for diverse learners, and g) effective communication with parents. Candidates will create a list of and use effective teaching strategies and develop technology applications and problem solving skills for the classroom. In addition, candidates will develop student assessments and rubrics, and create student behavior plans and learning modifications for the secondary classroom. Prerequisites: ED 100, 243, and 244; junior status recommended. (3 credit hours)

ED 418 – Methods of Teaching Secondary and Middle-Level English

Fall semester only
The course provides English education majors with training in methods of teaching grammar, composition, and literature. Through observation, instruction, and participation, prospective English teachers learn how to plan courses and lessons, develop exercises and other instructional materials, select textbooks, explain concepts and processes of grammar and composition, and evaluate student progress. ED 418 is designed to develop instructional skills required of secondary teachers. The course will involve many activities related to teaching including developing a) instructional strategies that will enhance the learning at all levels, b) lesson plans and delivering lessons, c) meaningful classroom learning activities, d) technology applications, e) student outcomes and assessments, f) teaching techniques for diverse learners, and g) effective communication with parents. Candidates will create a list of and use effective teaching strategies and develop technology applications and problem solving skills for the classroom. In addition, candidates will develop student assessments and rubrics, and create student behavior plans and learning modifications for the English Language Arts classroom. Prerequisites: ED 100, 243, and 244; junior status recommended. (3 credit hours)

ED 419 – Teaching Social Studies in the Secondary School

Fall semester only
This course is directed towards the development of the specific instructional skills needed for effective teaching in the public schools. Students prepare course outlines and lesson plans and present subject units which utilize various teaching aids. ED 419 is designed to develop instructional skills required of secondary history, government, and social studies teachers. The course will involve many activities related to teaching including developing a) instructional strategies that will enhance the learning at all levels, b) lesson plans and delivering lessons, c) meaningful classroom learning activities, d) technology applications, e) student outcomes and assessments, f) teaching techniques for diverse learners, and g) effective communication with parents. Candidates will create a list of and use effective teaching strategies and develop technology applications and problem solving skills for the classroom. In addition, candidates will develop student assessments and rubrics, and create student behavior plans and learning modifications for the secondary classroom. Prerequisites: ED 100, 243, and 244; junior status recommended. (3 credit hours)

ED 440 – Pre-Student Teaching Seminar for Elementary Majors

Every semester
This course includes the study of the principles, practices, and instructional strategies applicable to elementary and middle school teaching. The course is organized around the following framework: reflecting on teaching and learning, getting a job, focusing on technology, and focusing on classroom management techniques. Emphasis is placed on enabling participants to enhance the probability of learning for all students, regardless of their diverse backgrounds, intelligences, or exceptionalities. Candidates present their developmental portfolio for approval during this course. Prerequisite: This course is open only to those students who are on schedule to student teach the following semester. (3 credit hours)

ED 450 – Student Teaching in the Elementary or Middle School

Every semester
During this cumulative field experience, Teacher Education candidates plan and teach lessons and units, utilizing a variety of instructional strategies to motivate students with different learning styles. In addition, candidates create and evaluate multiple assessments and assess their impact on student learning. Candidates are expected to exhibit the values and ethics of a professional educator, take part in conferences, and assist in a variety of class activities. A major component of this class will be the creation of the Kansas Performance Teaching Portfolio (KPTP). Elementary candidates participate in teaching and related responsibilities throughout the entire day for a period of 15 weeks. Candidates earning PK-12 licensure split the student teaching experience and earn six hours of credit in ED 450 and six hours in ED 470. Prerequisite: ED 440 or ED 460 and approval by the Undergraduate Teacher Education Committee. (6-12 credit hours)

ED 460 – Pre-Student Teaching Seminar for Secondary and/or Middle-Level Majors

Every semester
This course includes the study of the principles, practices, and instructional strategies applicable to secondary and middle school teaching. This course is organized around the following framework: reflecting on teaching and learning, getting a job, focusing on technology, and focusing on classroom management techniques appropriate for the secondary or middle school classroom. Emphasis is placed on enabling participants to enhance the probability of learning for all students, regardless of their diverse backgrounds, intelligences, or exceptionalities. Candidates present their developmental portfolio for approval during this course. Prerequisite: This course is open only to those students who are on schedule to student teach the following semester. (3 credit hours)

ED 462 – Education Orientation Internship

Fall only
This internship gives the student a firsthand look at the beginning of a school year in an elementary, middle, or secondary school. Students choose a teacher and spend the equivalent of one full week observing and helping. This week includes in-service days plus the first days the children attend school. This course should be taken during the academic year in which the student plans to enroll in the professional semester. Prerequisite: ED 100 and 243 and junior or senior status. (1 credit hour)

ED 470 – Student Teaching at the Secondary and/or Middle-Level

Every semester
During this cumulative field experience, Teacher Education candidates plan and teach lessons and units, utilizing a variety of instructional strategies to motivate students with different learning styles. In addition, candidates create and evaluate multiple assessments and assess their impact on student learning. Candidates are expected to exhibit the values and ethics of a professional educator, take part in conferences, and assist in a variety of in-class and extra-class activities. A major component of this class will be the creation of the Kansas Performance Teaching Portfolio (KPTP). Secondary school candidates participate in teaching and related responsibilities throughout the entire day for a period of 15 weeks. Candidates earning PK-12 licensure split the student teaching experience and earn six credits in ED 450 and six credits in ED 470. Prerequisites: ED 460 and approval by the Undergraduate Teacher Education Committee. (6-12 credit hours)

ED 480 – Student Teaching at the Middle Level

Every semester
During this cumulative field experience, Teacher Education candidates plan and teach lessons and units, utilizing a variety of instructional strategies to motivate students with different learning styles. In addition, candidates create and evaluate multiple assessments and assess their impact on student learning. Candidates are expected to exhibit the values and ethics of a professional educator, take part in conferences, and assist in a variety of in-class and extra-class activities. A major component of this class will be the creation of the Kansas Performance Teaching Portfolio (KPTP). Middle level candidates participate in teaching and related responsibilities throughout the entire day for a period of 15 weeks. Prerequisites: ED 460 and approval by the Undergraduate Teacher Education Committee. (12 credit hours)

ED 513 – Methods for Teaching Adaptive Learners

Fall only
For select students, ED 413 Methods for Teaching Adaptive Learners is offered for graduate-level credit (see description for ED 413). Prerequisites: ED 100, 243, 345, at least a 3.00 cumulative G.P.A., and Department Chair approval. (3 credit hours)

ED 514 – Characteristics of Adaptive Learners

Spring only
For select students, ED 414 Characteristics of Adaptive Learners is offered for graduate-level credit (see description for ED 414). Prerequisites: ED 100, 243, 345, at least a 3.00 cumulative G.P.A., and Department Chair approval. (3 credit hours)

ED 515 – Practicum for Adaptive Learners

Every semester
For select students, ED 415 Practicum for Adaptive Learners is offered for graduate-level credit (see description for ED 415). Prerequisites: ED 100, 243, 345, either 513 or 514, at least a 3.00 cumulative G.P.A., and Department Chair approval. (3 credit hours)

LICENSURE EXAM PASS RATES

Educator preparation program pass rates data allow students considering a career as a teacher to compare the performance of educator candidates from Baker University’s educator preparation programs to Kansas and national pass rate averages on the tests required for licensure as a teacher in Kansas.

What the Pass Rates Indicate

The pass rate indicates the percentage of candidates from a college or university that took and passed the examinations. Note that some candidates may take these examinations before they complete the educational program at the college or university, which could affect the pass rate.

Kansas Licensure Exams

To receive licensure in Kansas, candidates are required to take a series of subject-specific content tests known as Praxis. Approximately 36 other states have similar requirements. Candidates taking these tests are customarily enrolled in a college or university educator preparation program. Candidates also take another Praxis test called Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT). This test assess a new teacher’s knowledge and understanding of educational practices foundational to beginning a career as a professional educator. The test assesses key indicators of the beginning educator’s knowledge of topics such as human development, learning processes, instructional processes, diverse learners, educational psychology and professional issues.

Because institutional affiliation is self-reported on the Praxis exams, the data presented here may also include test scores for individuals who may not have attended a Baker educator preparation program, but who have taken the test and erroneously coded Baker University as a test score recipient. Similarly, the candidates have the option to identify their attending institution. All of the data in this document has been provided by the Educational Testing Service.

Pass Rate Data Just One Factor When Choosing a School

Please note that the test data was not collected nor is it intended to be used for the purpose of evaluating individual teacher preparation programs; many factors affect test score data. The data are provided as a service to interested individuals and represent only one of many sources of information that should be carefully considered when making college application decisions. Additionally, other criteria should be considered when applying to an institution of higher education, such as financial resources expended by the institution, curriculum offered, and the experience and number of advanced degrees held by the faculty, just to name a few. Parents and students should consider a variety of factors when making application decisions.

Scholarships

The Department of Education gives these awards with financial prizes to be applied to the following year’s tuition:
•    Mildred Hunt Riddle Departmental Recognition Scholarship for Education
•    Carol Lee Miller and Carla Miller Reynolds Scholarship
•    E. Vincent “Doc” Reichley Scholarship
•    Helen Bauer Endowed Scholarship
•    Rose Lister Goertz Scholarship
•    Clara Louise Johanning-Dufrene Scholarship
•    Dan and Peggy Harris Scholarship

STUDENT LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

DIALOGOS RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM
Dialogos creates opportunities for the free exchange of ideas among scholars. Students from every part of the academy present original works, in a variety of forms and mediums, and engage with an interdisciplinary community of peers, staff and faculty. The symposium also features a keynote address from a prominent Baker alum. Through open and critical discussion, participants learn from and contribute to the betterment of the whole. At Dialogos, to quote John Wesley, we "think and let think."
Dialogos creates opportunities for the free exchange of ideas among scholars. Students from every part of the academy present original works, in a variety of forms and mediums, and engage with an interdisciplinary community of peers, staff and faculty. The symposium also features a keynote address from a prominent Baker alum. Through open and critical discussion, participants learn from and contribute to the betterment of the whole. At Dialogos, to quote John Wesley, we "think and let think."
BOOK Program
Students are encouraged to participate in the BOOK Program (Baker Organizational Observation for Knowledge) to enhance their internship experiences. The program encourages students to look deeper into organizations by researching the history, mission, structure, products and services, finances and management of the company. At the conclusion of the program, presentations are given in front of a panel of judges who choose the winner of a cash prize.
BOOK Program
Students are encouraged to participate in the BOOK Program (Baker Organizational Observation for Knowledge) to enhance their internship experiences. The program encourages students to look deeper into organizations by researching the history, mission, structure, products and services, finances and management of the company. At the conclusion of the program, presentations are given in front of a panel of judges who choose the winner of a cash prize.

FACULTY

Amy Wintermantle

Dr. Amy Wintermantel

Department Chair, Associate Professor of Education | amy.wintermantel@bakerU.edu
Dr. Amy Wintermantel has a long list of passions: creating things, growing plants, learning about abnormal psychology, and so on. So it’s no surprise that she was drawn to education, where she can study and teach about a variety of topics. Her students get these same opportunities, plus one big reward. “When you’re finished with our program, you’re ready to begin changing lives.”

B.A. Bethany College; M.S. Emporia State University; M.S., Ph.D. Kansas State University
Office: Case 201 | 785.594.4583

Jim FoilDr. Jim Foil

Assistant Professor of Education | jim.foil@bakerU.edu

B.S. Kansas State University, M.S. University of North Texas, Ph.D. University of Kansas
Office: Case 202 | 785.594.8368

Charlise ProsserDr. Charlsie Prosser

Assistant Professor of Education | cprosser@bakerU.edu

B.S. Austin Peay State University, M.S. University of Missouri at Kansas City, Ed.S. Austin Peay State University, Ed.D. Baker University
Office: Case 203 | 785.594.4593

Tonya SimmsTonya Simms

School of Education Licensure Officer, Data Manager, Departmental Assistant | tonya.simms@bakerU.edu

Office: Case 205A | 785.594.4502

Merrie SkaggsDr. Merrie Skaggs

Supervisor of Student Teachers | merrie.skaggs@bakerU.edu

A.B. Baker University, M.S. University of Kansas, Ph.D. University of Kansas
785.594.4502

CONTACT US

Tonya Simms
Departmental Assistant, Data Manager &
School of Education Licensure Officer
Office: Case 205A
785.594.4502
tonya.simms@bakeru.edu