Office of Student Affairs

  • Contact or Visit Us
  • Cassy Bailey, Dean of Students
  • 785.594.8431
  • fax: 785.594.4568
  • cassy.bailey@bakerU.edu
  • P.O. Box 65
  • Baldwin City, KS 66006-0065
  • Hours
  • Monday-Friday: 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
  • Second Floor - Harter Union

Advice for Common Concerns

Personal | Student/Professor | Discouragement | Money

Personal Issues

Areas of Concern

Your daughter lives in a double suite and calls to say that her roommate is driving her crazy with late-night phone calls, friends over all the time, messy habits, and lack of respect for her things. She thought being in the NLC would bring more quiet time than this and now she wants a private room. She wants you to talk to Residence Life and make the request.

Things to Consider

Has your student ever shared a room before? Did she and her roommate talk about basic expectations and “rules of the room” before school began? Does the roommate know her habits are bothering your daughter? Have they enlisted the help of their resident assistant?

One of the most interesting nonacademic sides of the college transition comes in the form of another student in your student’s living space. Some students fail to realize academics are only part of the college equation. The bigger part is taking responsibility and learning to face new challenges. It is important that roommates communicate to make sure that issues cannot be solved before drastic measures are taken. This is the time to encourage your daughter to talk to her RA for guidance.

Please encourage your student to seek assistance. The student, rather than a parent, should initiate requests for assistance. 

Who Can Help

Your student’s resident assistant or area coordinator

Student/Professor Issues

Areas of Concern

Your daughter makes a D on the first test and says she can pull it up with the other grades. In a later conversation you learn that your daughter isn’t really keeping up with her daily assignments and thinks the professor is unfair because he calls on her in class and states it’s clear she needs to keep up with homework better. She says she is working on it and will do better on the next test.

Things to Consider

Does your daughter have a history of good study habits? Does she understand that study requirements are different for a four-year university than for community college or high school?

Does she know she can talk to the professor if she is falling behind, really trying, and needs help? Is she afraid to talk to her professor? You can help her with a few conversation starters for an initial meeting with her professor.

It is helpful to talk about time management and study needs before your student begins classes. Encourage class attendance every day, even if the professor does not take roll. Prepare your student for the hard work ahead and remind her that college is a serious commitment to the future. It requires her full attention.

Who Can Help

  • Your student’s academic adviser
  • Student Academic Success tutoring, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it 785.594.8352
  • Your student’s professor

Discouragement Issues

Area of Concern

The first time your son comes home, he seems a little withdrawn. You’re surprised because every conversation while he’s been at school has been okay. You chalk it up to getting a handle on his new life. On Sunday, before he heads back, he looks upset and finally tells you that he hasn’t felt well, his classes are difficult and he just isn’t sure a university is for him. He’s unhappy with his choice of major, lack of friends and college in general.

Things to Consider

What kind of expectations did your student have about college? Was this more difficult than he expected? Did he know why he was attending? Does he have an idea what he wants to do following college or does he see the need for college in his future plans? Is his health okay? If he has ever seen a counselor for related issues, this might be a good time to revisit that relationship in the college setting. Sometimes having a third party to talk with is just what a student needs to get a more objective approach to a given situation. Baker’s counseling staff is skilled at recognizing transitional issues and helping students address them at the appropriate levels, often using campus resources.

Not only is your son making the transition to college, but he is also making the transition to responsible adulthood. The pressure grows to know what he wants. Make sure he knows you’re available to talk and assist and that you understand this is a big step for anyone. Also encourage him to seek help from his academic advisor or other campus resources.

Who Can Help

Money Issues

Area of Concern

Your son calls and asks if you can send more money because he has charged to the limit on his credit card, and his meal plan is maxed out. It’s not even fall break yet and you can’t understand why he is out of money.

Things to Consider

What kind of expectations have you put on spending? Is his meal plan heavy enough? Does he realize how much he is really spending? Has he ever had a charge card? Is he letting others eat on his charge?

Before your student arrives at school, determine who pays for various expenses. Dinners out? Clothing? What is the budget your student is expected to follow and how does he monitor his spending for the fun things?

Who Can Help

Financial Aid Office 785.594.4595