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Contact Us

  • Roger Boyd
  • Director of Natural Areas and Emeritus Professor of Biology
  • 785.424.0595
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • 1365 N. 1250 Road
  • Lawrence, KS 66046
  • Jonathan J. Boyd
  • Refuge Manager of the Baker Wetlands Complex
  • 785.979.6761
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photos



Video Links of the Baker Wetland

Videos produced by Ken Highfill of Lawrence, Kan.

  • Wildlife of the Baker Wetlands
    A collection of short clips of animals that can be seen in the vicinity of the Baker Wetlands
  • Bald eagles
    Bald eagles are often seen in the area of the Wetlands hunting injured ducks or geese during the fall and winter and goose goslings during the summer.
  • American mink
    The mink catches a fish and avoids a muskrat. Adult mink prey heavily on young muskrats.
  • Nighttime wildlife activity in the Baker Wetlands
    Various animals feed on several roadkill deer deposited in the Wetlands over the winter.
  • A composite of the life cycle of the monarch
    Monarchs breed at the Wetlands from late June through early October. The largest concentration of monarchs is found at the Wetlands during the fall migration, which usually occurs from mid-August through mid-September. Thousands of monarchs may be present during that time, mostly feeding on yellow flowers called bidens or bur marigold.
  • Great horned owls
    Great horned owls often nest at the Wetlands, usually taking over an old red-tailed hawk nest from the previous year. The nest in this video was in a flower pot on a balcony in Lawrence.
  • Barn owls
    These barn owls have nested in the large wooden box along Mink Creek north of 35th Street. The owls nested there for six or seven years and then one adult disappeared (probably died) and the other returned several more years but without finding a mate. Barn owls are not common in this part of the state but can be fairly common farther south and definitely more common in western Kansas.