CHEMISTRY | Successful Reactions


Our chemistry majors say they feel better prepared in their careers or in graduate school than their peers from other schools. Why? Baker students have extensive opportunities to conduct research and get hands-on experience with the latest equipment. And small class sizes ensure close work with faculty in the classroom and laboratory.

PREPARATION FOR MEDICAL SCHOOL

Baker students are accepted into medical school at a 87% rate. The national average is around 40%.

GET READY FOR GRADUATE SCHOOL

Our chemistry students have earned scholarships to major research programs, including the University of Kansas and Vanderbilt University.

ORIGINAL RESEARCH

Our lab courses feature student-designed research projects, and most of our chemistry majors partner with a faculty member to pursue original projects.

INTERNSHIPS & SUMMER RESEARCH

Many students find internships or full-time summer work with doctors and professional chemists or in research programs at major universities.

SCIENCE AT BAKER UNIVERSITY

Baker science graduates go on to become doctors, researchers, educators, and even water slide engineers. How does Baker prepare students for success after graduation? What are some of our recent alumni doing now? Watch the video to find out!

ANDREW | Biology & Chemistry Major, Class of 2017

“The faculty do an excellent job in presenting difficult and abstract concepts in a way that is accessible to students, which translates directly into Baker’s outstanding acceptance rates into medical, dental, and pharmacy schools. Due to Baker University’s outstanding science curriculum and devoted faculty, I feel fully prepared for the MCAT and higher education in preparation for a career in the medical field.”

CLINT | Chemistry & Physics Major, Class of 2016

“My favorite part of the Chemistry Department here at Baker is the one-on-one attention you get from your professors. At larger schools in the difficult general chemistry and organic chemistry courses you would be one in several hundred students. Here at Baker you get the opportunity to form personal relationships with faculty members and this makes all the difference in being successful in these courses.”

RYAN | Chemistry Major, Class of 2017

“The opportunity to learn something new every day is a great part of the program because there are a variety of courses offered, and a wide range of information is covered. Plus, the faculty have a personal interest they display in their students’ education. They genuinely care that students are learning the course material and their ability to alter their lecture methods to adapt to their students’ learning styles is also pretty special. They’re very approachable and helpful when students need extra help on assignments.”

CAREERS

Need more proof that Baker’s chemistry program prepares students for the future? Check out some of the jobs our chemistry majors have gotten after graduating:

  • Chief scientist at Oncimmune, which develops technology for early cancer detection
  • Forensic chemist for the FBI
  • Analysts in environmental chemistry and chemical synthesis
  • Chemistry professors and teachers
  • Medical doctors
  • Researchers

%

of Baker graduates are employed full time or enrolled in graduate school within six months of receiving their diploma.

Course Descriptions

R: course can be repeated for credit; P/NC: course graded on a pass/no credit basis

Courses required for these programs are listed in the current catalog.

CH 120 – Basic Chemistry 3 hrs.

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of chemistry. Topics include the structure and nature of atoms; chemical reactions and stoichiometry; gases; solutions; acids, bases, and salts; oxidation and reduction reactions; and nuclear chemistry. Prerequisite or co-requisite: Math Proficiency Phase II.

CH 121 – Basic Chemistry Laboratory 1 hr.                                                                                        

This course is an optional laboratory for Basic Chemistry (CH 120). Pre-nursing students only. Prerequisite: Declared Nursing major or permission of the instructor. Prerequisite or co-requisite: CH 120.

CH 137 – General Chemistry I 3 hrs.

This course is an introduction to the principles and applications of inorganic chemistry. Topics include the structure of atoms and molecules; chemical stoichiometry; aqueous chemistry; atomic spectra, chemical bonding, and molecular structure; periodic properties; properties of gases, liquids, and solutions; and elementary thermodynamics. Prerequisite: MA 145.

CH 137L – General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 hr.

This course is the laboratory component of CH 137. Prerequisite: MA 145. Co-requisite: CH 137.

CH 138 – General Chemistry II 3 hrs.

This course is a continuation and expansion of the material in CH 137. Topics include kinetics; equilibrium and the thermodynamics of spontaneity; and an introduction to elementary organic chemistry. Normally students enrolled in CH 138 should also be enrolled in CH 140, which is a prerequisite for all subsequent chemistry courses. Prerequisite: CH 137 and CH 137L.

CH 140 – Quantitative Analysis 2 hrs.

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of standard methods of analysis. The concepts of stoichiometry and equilibrium are emphasized, and the laboratory provides practice in gravimetric, volumetric, potentiometric, and spectrophotometric procedures. The course consists of one lecture and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite or co-requisite: CH 138.

CH 251 – Organic Chemistry I 4 hrs.

This course is an introduction to the study of the structure and reactivity of organic compounds. Topics include bonding, resonance, acid-base theory, spectroscopy, stereochemistry, nomenclature, and named reactions. Laboratory work includes basic techniques and reactions, chromatography, and spectroscopy. The course consists of three lectures and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisites: CH 138 and 140.

CH 252 – Organic Chemistry II 4 hrs.

This course is a continuation of CH 251. Topics include functional groups and reaction mechanisms. Laboratory work includes basic techniques and organic qualitative analysis. The course consists of three lectures and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: CH 251.

CH 341 – Instrumental Methods of Analysis 4 hrs.

The theory and practice of physicochemical and instrumental methods of analysis are presented. Areas covered are spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, chromatography, electroanalytical methods, and areas of current interest. The course consists of three lectures and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: CH 252.

CH 361 – Physical Chemistry I 3 hrs.

This course introduces the basic principles of physical chemistry. Topics covered in this course include thermodynamics, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and spectroscopy. Prerequisites: PC 226 and CH 252. Co-requisite: CH 361L is strongly encouraged.

CH 361L – Physical Chemistry I Lab 1 hr.

Lab exercises will focus on topics related to the material covered in CH 361. Co-requisite: CH 361 or permission of the instructor.

CH 362 – Physical Chemistry II 3 hrs.

This course expands on the topics outlined in CH 361 and covers statistical thermodynamics, additional topics of spectroscopy, kinetics, and transport phenomena. Prerequisite: CH 361 and 361L. Co-requisite: CH 362L is strongly encouraged.

CH 362L – Physical Chemistry II Lab 1 hr.

Lab exercises will focus on topics related to the material covered in CH 362. Prerequisites: CH 361 or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: CH 362 or permission of instructor.

CH 370 – Biochemistry 3 hrs.

This course is an introduction to the chemistry of biological compounds and their structure and reactions in living organisms. Topics include structures of amino acids, proteins, and enzymes; mechanisms of enzyme and coenzyme action; the structure and role of carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids; metabolic pathways; and the biosynthesis of proteins. Prerequisite: CH 252.

CH 381, 382 – Laboratory Teaching in Chemistry 1 hr.

This course provides practical experience in laboratory instruction. Students assist in teaching a laboratory section of a lower-level chemistry course. Students wishing to be certified to teach chemistry must complete at least one credit hour; the course is also recommended for students intending to go on to graduate school. These courses may be taken for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

CH 397, 398 – Chemical Research 1-3 hrs.

Qualified junior and senior students work closely with a faculty member in the program on a problem of current interest. The course is offered by individual arrangement, and the student must discuss the project with the appropriate faculty member well in advance of pre-registration. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

CH 440 – Advanced Topics in Analytical Chemistry 3 hrs.

This course offers an advanced examination of selected topics in analytical chemistry. Prerequisite: CH 341.

CH 451 – Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry 3 hrs.

This course offers an advanced examination of selected topics in organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CH 252.

CH 460 – Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry 3 hrs.

This course offers an advanced examination of selected topics in physical chemistry. Prerequisite: CH 252 and 362.

CH 470 – Advanced Topics in Biochemistry 3 hrs.

This course is a continuation of the topics introduced in CH 370, including structure and function of biological compounds, kinetics, enzyme mechanisms, metabolism, and information storage. Prerequisite: CH 370.

CH 475 – Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry 3 hrs.

This course offers an advanced examination of selected topics in inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: CH 252.

CH 481, 482 – Laboratory Teaching in Chemistry 1 hr.

This course provides practical experience in laboratory instruction. Students assist in teaching a laboratory section of a lower-level chemistry course. The course is also recommended for students intending to teach chemistry or go on to graduate school. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

CH 491 – Chemistry Seminar 2 hrs.

This course is a survey of the chemical literature in which extensive use will be made of chemical abstracts and current journals. The student must select a topic of interest, research the literature, and present a paper. Prerequisite: Senior status.

CH 497, 498 – Chemical Research 1-3 hrs.

Qualified junior and senior students work closely with a faculty member in the program on a problem of current interest. The course is offered by individual arrangement, and the student must discuss the project with the appropriate faculty member well in advance of pre-registration. Prerequisites: CH 252 and permission of the instructor.

Do you want to teach chemistry?
Baker University’s undergraduate education programs license teachers in chemistry (6-12). Students pursuing a degree in education and teacher licensure work closely with faculty advisors from the School of Education to fulfill the requirements for a degree from Baker University and teacher licensure in Kansas. Candidates are required to complete education course work and the required course work in at least one content area. Learn More >>

Scholarships

The Department of Biology and Chemistry gives these awards with financial prizes to be applied to the following year’s tuition:

  • Mildred Hunt Riddle Departmental Recognition Scholarship for Biology
  • Mildred Hunt Riddle Departmental Recognition Scholarship for Chemistry
  • Howard T. Bonnett Scholarship and Mrs. Ivan L. Boyd Memorial Scholarship
  • Margaret E. Scanlon Endowed Memorial Scholarship
  • E.J. Cragoe Scholarship
  • Chemical Rubber Company Press Freshman Chemistry Achievement Award
  • Sonia Browning Endowed Scholarship
  • Doris Cink and Kathryn Zimney Endowed Scholarship

Academic Recognition

  • Outstanding Senior in Biology
  • Outstanding Senior in Chemistry
  • Outstanding Junior in Biology
  • Outstanding Sophomore in Biology
  • Outstanding Freshman in Biology

STUDENT LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

DIALOGOS RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM
Dialogos creates opportunities for the free exchange of ideas among scholars. Students from every part of the academy present original works, in a variety of forms and mediums, and engage with an interdisciplinary community of peers, staff and faculty. The symposium also features a keynote address from a prominent Baker alum. Through open and critical discussion, participants learn from and contribute to the betterment of the whole. At Dialogos, to quote John Wesley, we "think and let think."
Dialogos creates opportunities for the free exchange of ideas among scholars. Students from every part of the academy present original works, in a variety of forms and mediums, and engage with an interdisciplinary community of peers, staff and faculty. The symposium also features a keynote address from a prominent Baker alum. Through open and critical discussion, participants learn from and contribute to the betterment of the whole. At Dialogos, to quote John Wesley, we "think and let think."
BOOK Program
Students are encouraged to participate in the BOOK Program (Baker Organizational Observation for Knowledge) to enhance their internship experiences. The program encourages students to look deeper into organizations by researching the history, mission, structure, products and services, finances and management of the company. At the conclusion of the program, presentations are given in front of a panel of judges who choose the winner of a cash prize.
BOOK Program
Students are encouraged to participate in the BOOK Program (Baker Organizational Observation for Knowledge) to enhance their internship experiences. The program encourages students to look deeper into organizations by researching the history, mission, structure, products and services, finances and management of the company. At the conclusion of the program, presentations are given in front of a panel of judges who choose the winner of a cash prize.

FACULTY

Molly AndersonMolly Anderson

Assistant Professor of Laboratory Instruction | molly.anderson@bakerU.edu

B.S. Baker University, M.S. Johns Hopkins University
Office: Boyd Science Center 303 | 785.594.4549

Michael Barbush

Dr. Michael Barbush

Professor of Chemistry, R. Milford White Chair in Chemistry | michael.barbush@bakerU.edu

B.S. Baker University; M.A., Ph.D. Washington University
Expertise: organic chemistry, biochemistry
Office: Boyd Science Center 301 | 785.594.8310 | More Info

Dr. Jamin Perry

Assistant Professor of Chemistry | jamin.perry@bakerU.edu
B.S. Missouri Southern State University, Ph.D. University of Missouri at Columbia
Expertise: physical chemistry
Office: Boyd Science Center 302 | 785.594.8326

CONTACT US

Kathy Wright
Department Assistant
Biology & Chemistry
Math, Physics, & Computer Science
Office: Boyd Science Center 227
785.594.8419
kathy.wright@bakerU.edu