FRENCH | A Whole New World

 

Central to the liberal arts education, the study of language provides greater insight into your own language, exposes you to another, diverse culture, and expands your exploration of the human experience. Through courses in the French language, literature, history, culture, and civilization, French students are introduced to the French language, French-speaking societies, and multiple facets of the francophone world.

GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP

French students are required to study abroad, to fully immerse themselves into their language studies. Baker makes studying abroad easy, allowing most Baker financial awards and scholarships to be applied directly to study abroad for one full semester.

AMITY INTERNS

Amity interns, who assist in language classes, provide students of world languages the opportunity to receive guidance from and speak with a native speaker, learn from a first-hand perspective about the cultures of French-speaking countries, and make international connections right on Baker’s campus.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT

Recognizing that practice is essential in acquiring fluency in a world language, students at all levels are invited to gather at la Table Française in the university dining hall every week to eat and speak French. For those without meal plans, lunch is provided by the Department of Humanities.

CELEBRATE SCHOOLWIDE

Each November, the Department of Humanities and Office for International and Heritage Students hold a series of events to celebrate international diversity. Campuswide, the week features international cuisine served in the dining hall and events focused on the cultures of our international students.

AMBER | French and Computer Science Major, Class of 2017

“I am an international student athlete from Nassau, Bahamas, seeking two degrees at Baker University, with majors in both French and computer science and a minor in business. Princeton Review matched me with three universities and I ended up choosing Baker because it just made sense. I have always loved French and my goal is to be able to speak fluently by the time I have graduated. I was just recently inducted into Alpha Mu Gamma Foreign Language Honor Society, so that’s a good start for me. In the long run I would like to pursue a career that combines both French and computer science.”

CAREERS

Our French majors have gone on to land these jobs:

  • Diplomat, Attaché, Foreign Service Officer
  • English Exchange Professor
  • Translator and Interpretor 
  • Writer and Journalist

%

of graduates are employed full time or enrolled in graduate school within six months of receiving their diploma.

Course Descriptions

R: course can be repeated for credit; P/NC: course graded on a pass/no credit basis

Courses required for these programs are listed in the current catalog.

FR 111 – Discovering French

Fall term, yearly
In this course, students will develop basic skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing French while discovering connections between the French language and the cultures of French-speaking countries. This course does not count toward a major or a minor in French. (4 credit hours)

FR 112 – Exploring French

Spring term, yearly
A continuation of the first-semester French course, this course provides further development of communicative skills, as well as a more detailed understanding of francophone cultures. This course does not count toward a major or a minor in French. Prerequisite: FR 111 or approved placement test result. (4 credit hours)

FR 203 – Building Proficiency in French

Fall term, yearly
Students will refine their communicative skills by learning the more complex stylistic and grammatical features of the language and expanding their vocabulary. The length of readings and compositions will increase and students will deepen their cultural knowledge of the francophone world. Prerequisite: FR 112 or approved placement test result. (3 credit hours)

FR 204 – Making Connections in French

Spring term, yearly
This course continues to review previously learned structures and to further develop communicative language skills. Students will make connections between French and other areas of interest or career aspirations. Prerequisite: FR 203 or approved placement test result. (3 credit hours)

FR 305 – French Composition in Cultural Context

In this course, students author several compositions of various rhetorical styles and engage in thoughtful reading of literary and expository works in French. This course provides a thorough review and study of French grammar, syntax, and idiomatic expressions in order to polish written skills. Prerequisite: FR 204 or permission of the instructor. (3 credit hours)

FR 306 – French Conversation in Cultural Context

This course seeks to increase vocabulary and conversational skills through class discussion and oral reports and to refine pronunciation through a study of French phonology. Prerequisite: FR 204 or permission of the instructor. (3 credit hours)

FR 340 – French Civilization and Culture

This course provides an historical approach to the accomplishments of the French, supplemented by readings and presentations pertaining to aspects of contemporary French culture and to the francophone world. Prerequisite: FR 204 or permission of the instructor. (3 credit hours)

FR 350 – Contemporary France

This course serves as an introduction to the study of contemporary France and the distinctive features of French culture as represented in various social and political institutions and as portrayed through film and literature. Prerequisite: FR 204 or permission of the instructor. (3 credit hours)

FR 360 – Introduction to French Literature

This course serves as an introduction to the study of French literature and the genres of poetry, drama, and fiction. Texts will be selected from a variety of periods and authors. Students will learn the tools necessary to critically analyze, discuss, and write about literature in French. Prerequisite: FR 204 or permission of the instructor. (3 credit hours)

FR 371 – Francophone Cinema

This course will serve to introduce students to an array of francophone films, which will be used as a springboard for class discussions. After viewing each film, class time will be spent reviewing vocabulary and discussing issues that the films raise, as well as their artistic merits. Some history of francophone cinema will be presented. Exams and written work will assess students’ knowledge of vocabulary and content of the films, as well as encourage critical thinking about the societal problems and achievements of the francophone world. (3 credit hours)

FR 375 – The Francophone World

This course will serve to enhance students’ knowledge of the culture, history, literature, and language of the francophone world. Through the lens of learning about the French-speaking world, students will continue to hone their language skills as advanced learners of French. The course will culminate in a final project. (3 credit hours)

Scholarships

The Department of Humanities gives these awards with financial prizes to be applied to the following years tuition:

  • Mildred Hunt Riddle Departmental Recognition Scholarship
  • Dr. Irene Murphy Memorial Scholarship
  • Etta and Orin Murphy Scholarship Kahle Endowed Scholarship
  • Kahle Endowed Scholarship
  • The Moorman Prize for Prose Writing
  • The Moorman Prize for Poetry Writing
  • Jefferson-Greiner Scholarship

STUDENT LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

DIALOGOS RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM
Dialogos creates opportunities for the free exchange of ideas among scholars. Students from every part of the academy present original works, in a variety of forms and mediums, and engage with an interdisciplinary community of peers, staff and faculty. The symposium also features a keynote address from a prominent Baker alum. Through open and critical discussion, participants learn from and contribute to the betterment of the whole. At Dialogos, to quote John Wesley, we "think and let think."
Dialogos creates opportunities for the free exchange of ideas among scholars. Students from every part of the academy present original works, in a variety of forms and mediums, and engage with an interdisciplinary community of peers, staff and faculty. The symposium also features a keynote address from a prominent Baker alum. Through open and critical discussion, participants learn from and contribute to the betterment of the whole. At Dialogos, to quote John Wesley, we "think and let think."
BOOK Program
Students are encouraged to participate in the BOOK Program (Baker Organizational Observation for Knowledge) to enhance their internship experiences. The program encourages students to look deeper into organizations by researching the history, mission, structure, products and services, finances and management of the company. At the conclusion of the program, presentations are given in front of a panel of judges who choose the winner of a cash prize.
BOOK Program
Students are encouraged to participate in the BOOK Program (Baker Organizational Observation for Knowledge) to enhance their internship experiences. The program encourages students to look deeper into organizations by researching the history, mission, structure, products and services, finances and management of the company. At the conclusion of the program, presentations are given in front of a panel of judges who choose the winner of a cash prize.

FACULTY

Erin Joyce

Dr. Erin Joyce

Professor of French | erin.joyce@bakerU.edu

B.A. University of Richmond; M.A., Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University
Expertise: second-language acquisition, written expression, French language and culture
Office: Case Hall 105C | 785.594.8413

CONTACT US

Barbara Coffey
Assistant, Department of Humanities
Office: Case Hall 105
785.594.8439
barbara.coffey@bakerU.edu