GERMAN | A Whole New World

 

Central to the liberal arts education, the study of language provides greater insight into your own language, exposes you to another, diverse culture, and expands your exploration of the human experience. Through courses in the German language, literature, history, culture, and civilization students are introduced to the language, German-speaking societies, and multiple facets of the German world.

GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP

German students are required to study abroad, to fully immerse themselves into their language studies. Baker makes studying abroad easy, allowing most Baker financial awards and scholarships to be applied directly to study abroad for one full semester.

AMITY INTERNS

Amity interns, who assist in language classes, provide students of world languages the opportunity to receive guidance from and speak with a native speaker, learn from a first-hand perspective about the cultures of German-speaking countries, and make international connections right on Baker’s campus.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT

Recognizing that practice is essential in acquiring fluency in a world language, students at all levels are invited to gather at Stammtisch in the university dining hall every week to eat and speak German. For those without meal plans, lunch is provided by the Department of Humanities.

CELEBRATE SCHOOLWIDE

Each November, the Department of Humanities and Office for International and Heritage Students hold a series of events to celebrate international diversity. Campuswide, the week features international cuisine served in the dining hall and events focused on the cultures of our international students.

LINDLEY | Economics Major, German Minor, Class of 2013

Lindley studied abroad in Vienna as an undergrad and loved it so much she applied and was accepted to Webster University’s international MBA program in Vienna. German, or any language for that matter, pairs well with anything in the business, economics, and STEM fields, and Lindley loved the crossover between the two.

ADAM | International Business Major, German Minor, Class of 2018

“Having a degree in German will not only help me communicate and immerse myself in European culture, but coupled with a degree in international business, it will open new doors for my goal to end up working globally. The German program here creates a great environment to communicate together in small groups and help teach it to each other. The environment is incredibly relaxed, allowing students to enjoy learning the language. With the small class sizes, teachers are able to individually help students with things like internships or other pathways for success. Baker gives students opportunities that someone couldn’t receive at any other school.”

CAREERS

Our German majors have landed these jobs:

  • Diplomat and Foreign Service Officer
  • English Exchange Professor
  • Translator and Interpretor 
  • Writer and Journalist

%

of graduates are employed full time or enrolled in graduate school within six months of receiving their diploma.

Course Descriptions

R: course can be repeated for credit; P/NC: course graded on a pass/no credit basis

Courses required for these programs are listed in the current catalog.

GN 111 – Discovering German

Fall term, yearly
In this course, students will develop basic skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing German while discovering connections between the German language and the cultures of the German-speaking countries. This course does not count toward a major or a minor in German. (4 credit hours)

GN 112 – Exploring German

Spring term, yearly
A continuation of the first-semester German course, this course provides further development of communicative skills, as well as a more detailed understanding of German-speaking cultures. This course does not count toward a major or a minor in German. Prerequisite: GN 111 or approved placement test result. (4 credit hours)

GN 203 – Building Proficiency in German

Fall term, yearly
Students will refine their communicative skills by learning the more complex stylistic and grammatical features of the language and expanding their vocabulary. The length of readings and compositions will increase and students will deepen their cultural knowledge of the German-speaking world. Prerequisite: GN 112 or approved placement test result. (3 credit hours)

GN 204 – Making Connections in German

Spring term, yearly
This course is a bridge to the advanced level. Students will become comfortable using and understanding more complex structures and vocabulary, both in speaking and writing. Greater language ability will enable students to deepen their understanding of German-speaking culture. Students will make connections between German and other areas of interest or career aspirations. Prerequisite: GN 203 or approved placement test result. (3 credit hours)

GN 305 – German Composition in Cultural Context

This course provides intensive work in written German communication. Students will practice the various kinds of writing tasks that are necessary for everyday life in a German-speaking country such as describing, telling stories, narrating sequences of events, summarizing, debating, and composing various types of letters. Prerequisite: GN 204 or permission of the instructor. (3 credit hours)

GN 306 – German Conversation in Cultural Context

This course provides intensive work in communicating in spoken German, with an emphasis on practical, idiomatic usage. Emphasis will be on oral production and listening comprehension. Class time will be spent on various communicative activities such as discussion and debate, role-playing, and presentations. Listening skills will be honed using authentic video and audio sources. Selected readings from German journals, newspapers, and Internet sources will be incorporated. Course topics and materials will be designed to stimulate reflection on German-language culture. Prerequisite: GN 204 or permission of the instructor. (3 credit hours)

GN 340 – German Civilization and Culture

This course, a survey of the civilization and culture of German-speaking countries, includes the study of major historical and social developments, geography, scientific accomplishments, art, music, and theatre. Emphasis is placed on the events and ideas that helped shape contemporary Germany and Austria. Prerequisite: GN 204 or permission of the instructor. (3 credit hours)

GN 350 – Contemporary German Culture

This course complements GN 340 German Civilization and Culture. Where that course focused on the history of Germany culture, this course will examine life in German-speaking countries today. The major institutions of society will be explored, such as family, workplace, education, religion, the economy, citizenship issues, the situation for minorities, the aftermath of German unification, and Germany’s role in the EU. Prerequisite: GN 204 or permission of the instructor. (3 credit hours)

GN 360 – Introduction to German Literature

This course provides an introduction to the various genres of literature in the German language, including poetry, short stories, novellas, plays, and novels (or novel excerpts). Students will learn vocabulary and concepts necessary for the interpretation and analysis of literature and will write several papers and engage in critical discussion about the works read. Many historical periods will be represented. Pre requisite: GN 204 or permission of the instructor. (3 credit hours)

GN 413 – Modern German Literature

This course will introduce students to several major works of German literature from the late 19th century to the present. We will examine currents of thought running through certain periods of modern German literature and their relationship to the social and historical context in which the texts were written and read. Prerequisite: GN 204 or permission of the instructor. (3 credit hours)

GN 420 – German Cinema

This course is intended as an introduction to German film. Throughout the course, we will look at the films within their historical and social contexts in order to expand knowledge of German culture. Class meetings will be spent primarily on discussion, viewing of film clips, student presentations, and in-class writing assignments. Students will be required to view films in the language lab. Class will be conducted in German. Prerequisite: GN 204 or permission of the instructor. (3 credit hours)

Scholarships

The Department of Humanities gives these awards with financial prizes to be applied to the following years tuition:

  • Mildred Hunt Riddle Departmental Recognition Scholarship
  • Dr. Irene Murphy Memorial Scholarship
  • Etta and Orin Murphy Scholarship Kahle Endowed Scholarship
  • Kahle Endowed Scholarship
  • The Moorman Prize for Prose Writing
  • The Moorman Prize for Poetry Writing
  • Jefferson-Greiner Scholarship

STUDENT LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

DIALOGOS RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM
Dialogos creates opportunities for the free exchange of ideas among scholars. Students from every part of the academy present original works, in a variety of forms and mediums, and engage with an interdisciplinary community of peers, staff and faculty. The symposium also features a keynote address from a prominent Baker alum. Through open and critical discussion, participants learn from and contribute to the betterment of the whole. At Dialogos, to quote John Wesley, we "think and let think."
Dialogos creates opportunities for the free exchange of ideas among scholars. Students from every part of the academy present original works, in a variety of forms and mediums, and engage with an interdisciplinary community of peers, staff and faculty. The symposium also features a keynote address from a prominent Baker alum. Through open and critical discussion, participants learn from and contribute to the betterment of the whole. At Dialogos, to quote John Wesley, we "think and let think."
BOOK Program
Students are encouraged to participate in the BOOK Program (Baker Organizational Observation for Knowledge) to enhance their internship experiences. The program encourages students to look deeper into organizations by researching the history, mission, structure, products and services, finances and management of the company. At the conclusion of the program, presentations are given in front of a panel of judges who choose the winner of a cash prize.
BOOK Program
Students are encouraged to participate in the BOOK Program (Baker Organizational Observation for Knowledge) to enhance their internship experiences. The program encourages students to look deeper into organizations by researching the history, mission, structure, products and services, finances and management of the company. At the conclusion of the program, presentations are given in front of a panel of judges who choose the winner of a cash prize.

FACULTY

Cynthia ApplDr. Cynthia Appl

Professor of German, Chair of the Department of the Humanities | cynthia.appl@bakerU.edu

B.A., M.A. University of Kansas; Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania
Expertise: German literature of the 18th and 20th century, second-language pedagogy
Office: Case Hall 105E | 785.594.8449

CONTACT US

Barbara Coffey
Assistant, Department of Humanities
Office: Case Hall 105
785.594.8439
barbara.coffey@bakerU.edu