MATHEMATICS | Make Your Education Count


Mathematics provides the tools used by scientists to explore the universe, used by engineers to design devices that shape our society, and used by scientists and engineers to describe their results and designs. To understand our society and help shape its future, you must understand the influence of science and technology. This requires understanding mathematics and its uses.

Our mathematics majors develop the logical reasoning, problem-solving, and situational analysis skills needed to succeed in any field they choose after graduation.

EARNING POWER

Baker graduates earn higher average salaries 10 years into their careers than peers from other Kansas universities.

RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES

Many of our math majors successfully participate in Research Experiences for Undergraduates programs held at major universities over the summer and develop their skills in math, science, and technology.

SMALL CLASS SIZES

Students are guaranteed personal, one-on-one attention from professors thanks to our small classes.

GRADUATE SCHOOL PREPARATION

Baker grads often receive graduate scholarships to major research programs including Stanford University, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Kansas.

TYLER | Mathematics Major, Class of 2018

“After graduation, I want to become a math teacher. I’ve always wanted to become a secondary ed teacher and after the preparation the math department here has given me, I know I’m going to be very well equipped for the real world. The professors here know so much about their field of study that when they teach, you gain a tremendous amount of information.”

BEN | Mathematics Major, Class of 2017

“The best part of the mathematics program is the connections you make. Because this major is pretty small, you can really get to know your classmates and professors, who work with you and want the best for you. They will try to match their teaching to your interests or future jobs.”

CAREERS

Mathematics majors from Baker have landed jobs in these fields:

  • Computer Science
  • Engineering
  • Aviation
  • Education

%

of graduates are employed full time or enrolled in graduate school within six months of receiving their diploma.

Course Descriptions

R: course can be repeated for credit; P/NC: course graded on a pass/no credit basis

Courses required for these programs are listed in the current catalog.

MA 090 – Intermediate Algebra

Generally taught every semester
This course is an introduction to algebra including polynomials, algebraic fractions, first-degree and second-degree equations and inequalities, exponents, radicals, graphing, relations, functions, and systems of linear equations. Students with an ACT Math score of less than 22 will be required to pass this course with a C or higher. (This course counts toward the determination of full-time student status, but does not count toward the minimum credit hours needed for graduation under this catalog.) P/NC (3 credit hours)

MA 091 – Intermediate Algebra Lab

This course is designed to work in conjunction with MA 090 to provide students an opportunity to review and apply the skills and concepts introduced during MA 090. (This course counts toward the determination of full-time student status, but does not count toward the minimum credit hours needed for graduation under this catalog.) Co-requisite: MA 090. P/NC (1 credit hour)

MA 142 – The Language of Mathematics

Generally taught every spring semester
The purpose of this course is to help students learn to read, write, and think in the abstract, symbolic language of mathematics. The course focuses on both oral and written modes of communication and includes grammar, syntax, vocabulary, synonyms, negations, sentence structure, paragraph structure, logic, and proof. Since this material is essential for all areas of mathematics, the target audience includes education majors and students seeking to meet the proficiency requirement. Prerequisite: An ACT Math score of 22 or higher, or SAT Math score of 500 or higher, or MA 090. (3 credit hours)

MA 145 – College Algebra

Generally taught every semester
This course includes a study of algebraic equations, inequalities, functions, graphs, polynomials, rational functions, and exponential and logarithmic functions. The target audience includes students preparing for calculus and science courses. Prerequisite: An ACT Math score of 22 or higher, or SAT Math score of 500 or higher, or MA 090. (3 credit hours)

MA 146 – Trigonometry

Generally taught every fall semester
In this course students will study trigonometric functions and their inverses, solve triangles, solve trigonometric identities and equations, and learn to graph trigonometric functions and their inverses. Co-requisite: MA 171 or permission of instructor. (2 credit hours)

MA 171 – Calculus I

Generally taught every semester
This course is the beginning course in calculus. Topics to be studied include functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, applications of the derivative, definite integral, and topics in differential calculus. Prerequisites: Students should have a strong background in algebra and trigonometry. This can be accomplished in a variety of ways, such as a high school pre-calculus course with trigonometry or both MA 145 and MA 146 with grades of C or higher. Students who have questions about their preparation should talk to a member of the math department. Students with strong algebra skills who need trigonometry may take MA 146 as a co-requisite. (Students planning on taking MA 171 in the spring should enroll in MA 146 in the prior fall semester since MA 146 is generally only offered in the fall semester.) (4 credit hours)

MA 172 – Calculus II

Generally taught every semester
This course is a continuation of MA 171. Topics to be studied include more techniques of integration and applications of calculus, including sequences and series. Prerequisite: MA 171 with a grade of C or higher. (4 credit hours)

MA 221 – Statistics I

Generally taught every semester
This course begins with statistical methods for organizing and describing data. Methods are presented for describing both single variables and describing relationships between two variables. Both graphical and numerical summaries are presented. Designs for producing data are introduced. Probability, random variables, and sampling distributions are also introduced. Prerequisites: Mastery of spreadsheets; an ACT Math score of 22, or SAT Math score of 500 or higher, or MA 090. (3 credit hours)

MA 230 – Quantitative Analysis for Business and Economics I

The purpose of this course is to provide students an opportunity to develop and expand upon their quantitative analysis and reasoning skills in the context of problems and challenges often faced by leaders in business, accounting, and economic research Prerequisite: An ACT math score of 22 or higher, or MA 090. (Cross-listed as BS 230.) (4 credit hours)

MA 261 – Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Teachers I

Generally taught every fall semester
This course studies the structure of the real number system with special emphasis on modern concepts. It is required of all Elementary Education and Middle-Level Mathematics Education majors. A grade of C or higher is required for licensure. Prerequisites: Elementary or Middle-Level Mathematics Education major or permission of the Department Chair; MA 142 or 145, or permission of instructor. (3 credit hours)

MA 262 – Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Teachers II

Generally taught every spring semester
This course is a continuation of MA 261 with topics from probability, statistics, and geometry including measurement, the metric system, and transformations. Prerequisite: MA 261. (3 credit hours)

MA 271 – Calculus III

Generally taught every spring semester
This course is a continuation of MA 172. Topics to be studied include vectors, vector calculus, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, tangent planes, maxima and minima, and multiple integration. Prerequisite: MA 172 with a grade of C or higher. (3 credit hours)

MA 281 – Introduction to Linear Algebra

Generally taught every fall semester
This course includes systems of linear equations, vector spaces, matrices, determinants, reduction to diagonal form, eigenvalues, and geometric applications. Prerequisite: MA 172 with a grade of C or higher. (4 credit hours)

MA 291 – Introduction to Higher Mathematics

Generally taught every fall semester
Introduction to Higher Mathematics covers basic notations, concepts, and proof techniques needed for more advanced courses in mathematics and computer science. Topics will include basic set theory, functions, relations, and mathematical induction, with an introduction to graph theory and combinatorics. Prerequisite: MA 172 with a grade of C or higher. (3 credit hours)

MA 321 – Statistics II

Generally taught every semester
This course is a continuation of MA 221 and covers topics in inferential statistics including hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, linear regression, and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: MA 221 or permission of instructor. (3 credit hours)

MA 330 – Quantitative Analysis for Business and Economics II

The purpose of this course is to provide students an opportunity to further develop and expand upon their quantitative analysis and reasoning skills in the context of problems and challenges often faced by leaders in business, accounting, and economic research. Prerequisite: BS 230 or equivalent course (will require instructor approval). (Cross-listed as BS 330.) (4 credit hours)

MA 331 – Teaching Experience in Mathematics

This course provides practical experience teaching and coaching mathematics. Students enrolled in the course will coach students in the lab sessions of MA 090 (Intermediate Algebra) and administer and grade quizzes. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair. R; P/NC (1-2 credit hours)

MA 332 – Geometry for Teachers

Generally taught spring semester, odd years
This course is a course in geometry for teachers. Students will examine middle school and high school geometry topics from an advanced perspective. Topics included are congruence, distance and similarity, trigonometry, area and volume, and axiomatic and Euclidean geometry. Prerequisites: MA 171, 172, 291, or permission of instructor. (3 credit hours)

MA 345 – Problem Seminar in Mathematics

Generally taught every spring semester
This seminar will improve students’ abilities to solve problems, learn independently, and communicate their results. There will be in-class problem-solving sessions and weekly readings in the history of mathematics which will form the basis for class discussion. Students will be required to write up a short report on one of the problems solved in class. Prerequisites: MA 171 and MA 172 with grade of C or higher. R; P/NC (1 credit hour)

MA 355 – Statistics and Modeling

Generally taught fall semester, even years
This is an introductory statistics course with an emphasis on modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, study design, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, analysis of variance, and logistic regression. Prerequisite: MA 171 with a grade of C or higher and sophomore status, or permission of the instructor. (3 credit hours)

MA 359 – Mathematical Methods of Physical Science

This course introduces students to mathematical techniques beyond those covered in MA 271 that are of fundamental importance in the physical sciences. Topics covered include the gradient, divergence, curl and del operators; line, surface, and volume integrals; and Fourier series. Prerequisite: MA 271 with a grade of C or higher. (Cross-listed as PC 359.) (3 credit hours)

MA 362 – Modern Geometries

Generally taught spring semester, even years
This course will study how different geometric systems arise as a consequence of choosing different systems of axioms, especially the axiom systems leading to Euclidean geometry and hyperbolic geometry. Prerequisite: MA 291 with a grade of C or higher. (3 credit hours)

MA 372 – Differential Equations

Generally taught every spring semester
This is a course in ordinary differential equations. Topics will include first order equations, equations and systems with constant coefficients, undetermined coefficients, variations of parameters, and applications. Prerequisite: MA 281 with a grade of C or higher. (3 credit hours)

MA 383 – Introduction to Modern Algebra

Generally taught fall semester, even years
This is an advanced algebra course that includes algebraic structures with groups, fields, and rings and their applications. Prerequisite: MA 281 and 291, both with a grade of C or higher. (3 credit hours)

MA 385 – Probability

Generally taught fall semester, odd years
This is a course in probability that will include the following topics: sample spaces, axioms and elementary theorems of probability, conditional probability and independence, random variables, probability distributions, expectation, multivariate distributions, and limit theorems. Prerequisite: MA 172 and either MA 291 or permission of instructor. (3 credit hours)

MA 445 – Senior Seminar in Mathematics

Generally taught every spring semester
This seminar will improve students’ abilities to solve problems, learn independently, and communicate their results to others. There will be in-class problem-solving sessions and weekly readings in the history of mathematics which will form the basis for class discussion. Students will consult with the course instructor(s) to select an expository article on a mathematical topic for them to report on in class and to select an interesting problem for them to work on throughout the semester. Students will write up the results of their work on the problem and present their results to the class. Additionally, students will take the ETS Major Field Exam, which will form a small part of their grade for the course. Prerequisite: MA 171, 172, 271, 281, 291, 345, and one upper-college math course other than MA 321 or 332. (3 credit hours)

MA 472 – Advanced Applied Statistics

Generally taught spring semester, odd years
This is an advanced statistics course covering estimation, testing hypotheses, regression and correlation, linear models, and the design of experiments. Prerequisites: MA 321 or 355, and MA 172 (both with a grade of C or higher) or permission of the instructor. (3 credit hours)

MA 491 – Introduction to Real Analysis

Generally taught fall semester, odd years
This is an advanced course in calculus including limits, continuity, differentiability, integrability, and infinite series, with emphasis on precise definitions and proofs of theorems. Prerequisite: MA 271 and 291, both with a grade of C or higher. (3 credit hours)

MA 493 – Introduction to Complex Analysis

This is an advanced course in the study of complex-valued functions of a complex variable, and it covers the arithmetic of complex numbers, the definition of specific functions, the differentiation and integration of such functions, series, residues and poles, and mappings of the complex plane into itself. Prerequisites: MA 271 and MA 291, both with a grade of C or higher. (3 credit hours)

Do you want to teach math?
Baker University’s undergraduate education programs license teachers in mathematics (6-12) and Middle-Level Mathematics (5-8). Students pursuing a degree in education and teacher licensure work closely with faculty advisors from the School of Education to fulfill the requirements for a degree from Baker University and teacher licensure in Kansas. Candidates are required to complete education course work and the required course work in at least one content area. Learn More >>

Scholarships

The Department of Computer Science, Mathematics, and Physics gives these awards with financial prizes to be applied to the following year’s tuition:

  • Mildred Hunt Riddle Departmental Recognition Scholarship for Computer Science, Mathematics, and Physics
  • Dr. Calvin Foreman Memorial Scholarship
  • Howard T. Bonnett Scholarship
  • Jennifer Burton Memorial Scholarship
  • Grace Barnhill Champlin Memorial Scholarship
  • Platt-Butler Endowed Scholarship

STUDENT LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

DIALOGOS RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM
Dialogos creates opportunities for the free exchange of ideas among scholars. Students from every part of the academy present original works, in a variety of forms and mediums, and engage with an interdisciplinary community of peers, staff and faculty. The symposium also features a keynote address from a prominent Baker alum. Through open and critical discussion, participants learn from and contribute to the betterment of the whole. At Dialogos, to quote John Wesley, we "think and let think."
Dialogos creates opportunities for the free exchange of ideas among scholars. Students from every part of the academy present original works, in a variety of forms and mediums, and engage with an interdisciplinary community of peers, staff and faculty. The symposium also features a keynote address from a prominent Baker alum. Through open and critical discussion, participants learn from and contribute to the betterment of the whole. At Dialogos, to quote John Wesley, we "think and let think."
BOOK Program
Students are encouraged to participate in the BOOK Program (Baker Organizational Observation for Knowledge) to enhance their internship experiences. The program encourages students to look deeper into organizations by researching the history, mission, structure, products and services, finances and management of the company. At the conclusion of the program, presentations are given in front of a panel of judges who choose the winner of a cash prize.
BOOK Program
Students are encouraged to participate in the BOOK Program (Baker Organizational Observation for Knowledge) to enhance their internship experiences. The program encourages students to look deeper into organizations by researching the history, mission, structure, products and services, finances and management of the company. At the conclusion of the program, presentations are given in front of a panel of judges who choose the winner of a cash prize.

FACULTY

Jean Johnson

Dr. Jean Johnson

Professor of Mathematics, Chair of the Department of Mathematics, Computer Science & Physics | jean.johnson@bakerU.edu

B.S. Allegheny College; M.S., Ph.D. Iowa State University
Expertise: statistics, general mathematics
Office: Boyd Science Center 329 | 785.594.8384

Eric Hays

Eric Hays

Math Instructor, Director of Institutional Research | eric.hays@bakerU.edu

B.S., M.S. University of Kansas
Office: Mulvane | 785.594.4565

Louis Levy

Dr. Louis Levy

Associate Professor of Mathematics | louis.levy@bakerU.edu

The constant problem solving and subsequent reward of mathematics are what drew Dr. Louis Levy to the field. But what has kept him in teaching is getting to know his students.

“The small community at Baker gives me the opportunity to get to know my students. I enjoy that I often have students for several different classes during their time at Baker.”

B.S. University of Maryland; M.S., Ph.D. North Carolina State University
Office: Boyd Science Center 326 | 785.594.7853

Mircea Martin

Dr. Mircea Martin

Associate Professor of Mathematics | mircea.martin@bakerU.edu

B.S., M.S. University of Bucharest; Ph.D. University of Iasi in Romania
Office: Boyd Science Center 330 | 785.594.8466

CONTACT US

Kathy Wright
Department Assistant
Biology & Chemistry
Math, Physics, & Computer Science
Office: Boyd Science Center 227
785.594.8419
kathy.wright@bakerU.edu