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RECREATION

Students in our recreation program have the opportunity to turn a lifelong passion for health and fitness into a rewarding vocation. Our recreation program prepares graduates to promote active, healthy lifestyles for all populations through programs that focus on the whole person.

The curriculum integrates both theory and real-world experience that emphasizes academic learning, physical development, and active engagement in ways that allow graduates to educate and inspire success in their communities.

BEYOND TEXTBOOKS & LECTURES

Students preparing for a career in recreation participate in practicum and internship experiences with recreation professionals, where they apply what they learn in the classroom to on-site experiences.

PERSONAL ATTENTION

Our small classes ensure students get personal attention from faculty members and engage in robust discussions with classmates.

SCHOLARSHIPS

From their first year to their last, students are eligible for departmental and academic scholarships, as well as scholarships for participating in campus activities. 

COMPREHENSIVE CURRICULUM

Students become well versed in communications, business, program development, and other areas to prepare for successful careers in an exciting, competitive field.

Recreation majors can travel down several paths when pursuing their profession. From nonprofit community organizations, commercial recreation, employee services, tourism and hospitality, private membership organizations, armed forces, and park agencies, students have many avenues to pursue through this recreation major.

Dr. Verneda Edwards

Associate Professor

CAREER TRACKS

Our recreation majors are prepared for jobs in these fields:

  • Commercial recreation
  • Nonprofit community organizations
  • Employee services
  • Tourism and hospitality
  • Private membership organizations
  • Armed forces
  • Park agencies

%

of Baker graduates are employed full time or enrolled in graduate school within six months of receiving their diploma.

Course Descriptions

R: course can be repeated for credit; P/NC: course graded on a pass/no credit basis

Courses required for these programs are listed in the current catalog.

EX 184 – Lifetime Fitness

This course examines factors which affect a person’s overall health and fitness across the lifespan. Students will conduct a variety of assessments intended to determine their current level of fitness and will examine ways to incorporate fitness into their daily lives. (3 credit hours)

EX 245 – Human Nutrition

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of human nutrition as related to growth, development, and the maintenance of good health. In addition to nutritional theory, students learn to analyze and plan nutritional regimes. This course is required for admission to most nursing schools and majors in several allied health science fields. (3 credit hours)

PE 210 – Introduction to Teaching Physical Education and Health

This course content includes instruction in the social, historical, and philosophical foundations of physical education, as well as components of lesson design. Course emphasis is placed on professional attitudes crucial for those working with young people: awareness of the value of physical education and health, respect for all students, acceptance of diversity and its impact on learning, and an awareness of the teacher’s role as the facilitator of student learning. The course will focus on the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective development of learners PreK-12. The use of technology will be embedded in the content of this course. Pre- or co-requisite: ED 100. (2 credit hours)

PE 240 – Techniques of Teaching Team Sports

Students will gain knowledge of teaching techniques for team sports traditionally found in physical education curricula. Rules of sport, strategy of team play, and individual skill performance are components of the course. Prerequisite: ED 100. Pre- or co-requisite: PE 243. (3 credit hours)

PE 241 – Techniques of Teaching Individual and Dual Sports

This course provides students with the skills to teach individual and dual sport activities traditionally found in physical education curricula. Rules of sport, strategy of team play, and skill performance are components of the course. Prerequisite: ED 100. Pre- or co-requisite: PE 243. (3 credit hours)

PE 303 – Methods of Teaching Early Childhood and Elementary Physical Education and Health

This course is a study of the principles related to the selection and use of teaching techniques for early childhood and elementary physical education and health. This includes understanding the values of physical activity for the promotion of healthy lifestyles, current trends in elementary physical education and health instruction, planning for instruction at the elementary level, providing a safe learning environment, and assessing student learning. The course will include the development of lesson plans, unit plans, and measurement techniques along with effective teaching skills for the elementary physical education and health classroom. The course will also include a field experience component at the elementary level. The course will involve many activities related to teaching, including a) selecting instructional strategies that will enhance learning, b) designing and delivering lessons, c) technology applications, d) identifying student outcomes and appropriate assessments, e) teaching to diverse learners, and f) communicating with parents. In addition to class meeting times, candidates will also be required to participate in 20 clock hours of practicum experience. Prerequisites: PE 240 and PE 241 or permission of the instructor. (3 credit hours)

PE 305 – Methods of Teaching Secondary Physical Education and Health

This course is a study of the principles related to the selection and use of teaching techniques for secondary physical education and health in sixth grade through high school. This includes understanding the characteristics of secondary students, the values of physical activity for the promotion of healthy lifestyles, current trends in secondary physical education and health instruction, planning for instruction at the secondary level, providing a safe learning environment, and assessing student learning. The course will include the development of lesson plans, unit plans, and measurement techniques along with effective teaching skills for the secondary physical education and health classroom. The course will also include a field experience component at the secondary level. The course will involve many activities related to teaching, including a) selecting instructional strategies that will enhance learning, b) designing and delivering lessons, c) technology applications, d) identifying student outcomes and appropriate assessments, e) teaching to diverse learners, and f) communicating with parents. In addition to class meeting times, candidates will also be required to participate in 20 clock hours of practicum experience. Prerequisites: PE 240 and PE 241 or permission of the instructor. (3 credit hours)

PE 351 – Physiology of Exercise for Physical Education and Health

This course is a study of how the human body responds to exercise and sports performance. Content that will be covered during this course includes: nutrition and the impact of a quality diet on human performance, stress (good and bad), aerobic and anaerobic movement, and the related areas of fitness such as strength, muscular endurance, body composition, and flexibility. Prerequisites: BI 246 and PE 327. Note: This course is not open to Exercise Science majors. (3 credit hours)

PE 439 – Internship for Recreation

BI 246 – Anatomy and Physiology I

This course is the first of a two-semester sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. Human Anatomy and Physiology I is required for students in Exercise Science and Physical Education, and for pre-professional students in Nursing and other allied health sciences. The course covers the basic anatomical and directional terminology; homeostasis; cell biology; histology; skeletal, muscle, nervous, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems; and the digestive system and metabolism. There are three lecture and discussion sessions and one laboratory session each week. This course does not count towards a major or minor in Biology. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or instructor permission. (3 credit hours)

BI 246L – Anatomy and Physiology I (Lab)

BS 141 – Introduction to Business

The course is intended for first-year Business majors, students who are undecided about majoring in Business, and non-majors who wish to obtain a broad overview of the operation of the business enterprise and its role in U.S. and international commerce. The roles of business as supplier of goods and services, employer participant in public affairs, and civic partner will be examined. Basic business functions of accounting, management, marketing, finance, and human resources will be introduced. Career options in business are also presented. (3 credit hours)

CO 115 – Introduction to Communication Studies

This course serves as an introduction to the principles of public speaking and interpersonal communication. Topics covered include models of communication, perception, listening, language, non-verbals, small groups, and relationships. Speaking performances are a central activity of the course. (3 credit hours)

CO 242 – Interpersonal Communications

This course is a study of communication in one-to-one situations. Class sessions include exercises, role playing, and simulations. The goal of the course is improvement of communication and deepened self-awareness. (3 credit hours)

Scholarships

The Department of Education gives these awards with financial prizes to be applied to the following year’s tuition:

  • Mildred Hunt Riddle Departmental Recognition Scholarship for Education
  • Carol Lee Miller and Carla Miller Reynolds Scholarship
  • E. Vincent “Doc” Reichley Scholarship
  • Helen Bauer Endowed Scholarship
  • Rose Lister Goertz Scholarship
  • Clara Louise Johanning-Dufrene Scholarship
  • Dan and Peggy Harris Scholarship

Students may be eligible for the following award to be applied to the following year’s tuition:

  • Mildred Hunt Riddle Departmental Recognition Scholarship for Health and Physical Education

STUDENT LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

DIALOGOS RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

Dialogos creates opportunities for the free exchange of ideas among scholars. Students from every part of the academy present original works, in a variety of forms and mediums, and engage with an interdisciplinary community of peers, staff and faculty. The symposium also features a keynote address from a prominent Baker alum. Through open and critical discussion, participants learn from and contribute to the betterment of the whole. At Dialogos, to quote John Wesley, we "think and let think."

Dialogos creates opportunities for the free exchange of ideas among scholars. Students from every part of the academy present original works, in a variety of forms and mediums, and engage with an interdisciplinary community of peers, staff and faculty. The symposium also features a keynote address from a prominent Baker alum. Through open and critical discussion, participants learn from and contribute to the betterment of the whole. At Dialogos, to quote John Wesley, we "think and let think."

BOOK Program

Students are encouraged to participate in the BOOK Program (Baker Organizational Observation for Knowledge) to enhance their internship experiences. The program encourages students to look deeper into organizations by researching the history, mission, structure, products and services, finances and management of the company. At the conclusion of the program, presentations are given in front of a panel of judges who choose the winner of a cash prize.

BOOK Program

Students are encouraged to participate in the BOOK Program (Baker Organizational Observation for Knowledge) to enhance their internship experiences. The program encourages students to look deeper into organizations by researching the history, mission, structure, products and services, finances and management of the company. At the conclusion of the program, presentations are given in front of a panel of judges who choose the winner of a cash prize.

FACULTY

Verneda EdwardsDr. Verneda Edwards

Associate Professor | vedwards@bakerU.edu
“Education has always been important to my family so it just seemed natural that I would become an educator. I have never regretted the decision to become a physical educator. My favorite part of teaching at Baker is working with our students and continuing to learn from them.”

B.S. Kansas State University, M.S. Kansas State University, Ed.D. Oklahoma State University
Office: Overland Park campus | 913.344.1227

 

CONTACT US

Angela Harvey
Department Assistant, Data Manager, 
& School of Education Licensure Officer
Office: Case
205 785.594.4502
angela.harvey@bakerU.edu

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